29 December 1997 Lethal photosensitization of biofilm-grown bacteria
Author Affiliations +
Abstract
Antibacterial agents are increasingly being used for the prophylaxis and treatment of oral diseases. As these agents can be rendered ineffective by resistance development in the target organisms there is a need to develop alternative antimicrobial approaches. Light-activated antimicrobial agents release singlet oxygen and free radicals which can kill adjacent bacteria and a wide range of cariogenic and periodontopathogenic bacteria has been shown to be susceptible to such agents. In the oral cavity these organisms are present as biofilms (dental plaques) which are less susceptible to traditional antimicrobial agents than bacterial suspensions. The results of these studies have shown that biofilm-grown oral bacteria are also susceptible to lethal photosensitization although the light energy doses required are grater than those needed to kill the organisms when they are grown as aqueous suspensions.
© (1997) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Michael Wilson, "Lethal photosensitization of biofilm-grown bacteria", Proc. SPIE 3191, Photochemotherapy: Photodynamic Therapy and Other Modalities III, (29 December 1997); doi: 10.1117/12.297832; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.297832
PROCEEDINGS
11 PAGES


SHARE
Back to Top