4 February 1999 Various new applications of fiber optic infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy for dermatology
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Abstract
Fiberoptical evanescent wave Fourier transform infrared (FEW- FTIR) spectroscopy has been applied in the middle infrared (MIR) wavelength range (3 to 20 micrometer) to the in vivo diagnostics of normal skin tissue, acupuncture points as well as precancerous and cancerous conditions. The FTIR-FEW technique, using nontoxic unclad fibers, is suitable for noninvasive, sensitive investigations of skin tissue for various dermatological studies of skin caner, aging, laser treatment, cosmetics, skin allergies, etc. This method is direct, nondestructive, and fast (seconds). Our optical fibers are nonhygroscopic, flexible, and characterized by extremely low losses. In this study, we have noninvasively investigated more than 300 cases of normal skin, acupuncture points, precancerous and cancerous tissue in the range of 1400 to 1800 cm-1. The results of our analysis of skin and other tissue are discussed in terms of structural and mathematical similarities and differences on a molecular level. In addition, we have also performed cluster analysis, using principal component scores, to confirm pathological classifications and to discriminate between genders. We have found good agreement with prior pathological classifications for normal skin tissue and melanoma tumors and normal females were distinctly separate from males.
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Reinhard F. Bruch, Natalia I. Afanasyeva, Sydney Sukuta, Angelique L. Brooks, Volodymyr Makhine, Sergei F. Kolyakov, "Various new applications of fiber optic infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy for dermatology", Proc. SPIE 3564, Medical Applications of Lasers in Dermatology, Cardiology, Ophthalmology, and Dentistry II, (4 February 1999); doi: 10.1117/12.339136; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.339136
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KEYWORDS
Tissues

Skin

Tumors

Optical fibers

Spectroscopy

Fiber optics

Diagnostics

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