28 December 1998 Wavelet-based progressive view morphing
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Proceedings Volume 3653, Visual Communications and Image Processing '99; (1998); doi: 10.1117/12.334712
Event: Electronic Imaging '99, 1999, San Jose, CA, United States
Abstract
This paper presents a new view synthesis techniques using morphing and 2-d discrete wavelet transformation. We completely base on pairwise images that are known without calibrating camera and the depth information of images. First, we estimate the Fundamental Matrix related with any pair of images. Second, using fundamental matrix, any pair of image planes can be rectified to be parallel and their corresponding points are lying on the same scanline. This gives an opportunity to generate new views with linear interpolating technique. Third, the pre-warped images are then decomposed into hierarchical structure with wavelet transformation. Corresponding coefficients between two decomposed images are therefore linear interpolated to form the multiresolution representation of an intermediate view. Any quantization techniques can be embedded here to compress the coefficients in depth. The compressed format is very suitable for storage and communication. Fourthly, when displaying, compressed images are decoded and an inverse wavelet transform is achieved. Finally, we use a post-warping procedure to transform the interpolated views to its desired position. A nice future of using wavelet transformation is its multiresolution representation mode, which makes generating views can be refined progressively and hence suitable for communication.
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Dan Xu, Paul Bao, "Wavelet-based progressive view morphing", Proc. SPIE 3653, Visual Communications and Image Processing '99, (28 December 1998); doi: 10.1117/12.334712; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.334712
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KEYWORDS
Wavelets

Image morphing

Wavelet transforms

Cameras

Computer graphics

Discrete wavelet transforms

Image analysis

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