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28 September 1999 Global Imaging Monitor of the Ionosphere (GIMI) on the Advanced Research and Global Observation Satellite (ARGOS): quick look results
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Abstract
The Global Imaging Monitor of the Ionosphere (GIMI) is one of nine space research and technology instruments aboard the Air Force Space Test Program's Advanced Research and Global Observation Satellite (ARGOS). The ARGOS was launched into a sun-synchronous polar orbit by a Delta II launch vehicle from Vendenberg AFB, CA on the morning of 23 February 1999. At the time of this writing, GIMI had completed preliminary check-outs in orbit, with actual data takes beginning in late May, 1999. The GIMI instrument consists of two far- ultraviolet cameras, using electron-bombarded CCD array detectors, operating in the 75 - 115 nm wavelength range (Camera 1) and the 131 - 160 and 131 - 200 nm wavelength ranges (Camera 2). Both cameras are mounted on a two-axis gimbaled pointing system and simultaneously view the same 9 degree(s)-square field.
© (1999) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
George R. Carruthers and Timothy D. Seeley "Global Imaging Monitor of the Ionosphere (GIMI) on the Advanced Research and Global Observation Satellite (ARGOS): quick look results", Proc. SPIE 3818, Ultraviolet Atmospheric and Space Remote Sensing: Methods and Instrumentation II, (28 September 1999); https://doi.org/10.1117/12.364151
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