30 November 1999 Development of an unattended ground sensor for ultraviolet laser-induced fluorescence detection of biological agent aerosols
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Abstract
A prototype of an unattended ground sensor has been developed for detection of biological agent aerosols. This point sensor uses ultraviolet laser induced fluorescence (UV LIF) to detect aerosol biological microorganisms collected on filter media. The concept can be designed to be compact, low power, and hardened to survive harsh delivery environments such as airdrop. The prototype consists of an air sampling system, a filter exchange mechanism, an Nd:YAG microlaser that is frequency tripled and quadrupled to generate 355-nm and 266-nm excitation wavelengths, a spectrometer, an intensified CCD detector, and a data acquisition and control system. The analysis utilizes a spectral database of fluorescence signatures of biological organisms and common interferents measured by Sandia for the Army's Edgewood Research and Development Engineering Center (ERDEC) and the Department of Energy's Chemical and Biological Non-proliferation (DOE CBNP) program. The analysis algorithms are based on algorithms developed by Sandia for an airborne UV LIF lidar system.
© (1999) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Kevin L. Schroder, Kevin L. Schroder, Philip J. Hargis, Philip J. Hargis, Randal L. Schmitt, Randal L. Schmitt, Daniel J. Rader, Daniel J. Rader, Isaac R. Shokair, Isaac R. Shokair, } "Development of an unattended ground sensor for ultraviolet laser-induced fluorescence detection of biological agent aerosols", Proc. SPIE 3855, Air Monitoring and Detection of Chemical and Biological Agents II, (30 November 1999); doi: 10.1117/12.371266; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.371266
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