17 September 1999 In vivo optical imaging and its application to the study of brain functions
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Proceedings Volume 3863, 1999 International Conference on Biomedical Optics; (1999) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.364359
Event: International Symposium on Biomedical Optics, 1999, Wuhan, China
Abstract
Primate inferotemporal cortex (IT) is thought to be essential for object recognition. To investigate the functional organization in IT, optical imaging based on intrinsic signals was carried out. The features critical for the activation of single cells were first determined in unit recordings with electrodes. In the subsequent optical imaging, presentation of the critical features activated patchy regions covering the site of the electrode penetration at which the critical feature had been determined. These results directly indicate the regional clustering of cells with similar stimulus selectivity and demonstrate the feasibility of optical imaging technique for the study of association cortex.
© (1999) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Gang Wang, Gang Wang, } "In vivo optical imaging and its application to the study of brain functions", Proc. SPIE 3863, 1999 International Conference on Biomedical Optics, (17 September 1999); doi: 10.1117/12.364359; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.364359
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