17 May 2000 Stress relaxation of porcine septal cartilage during radio-frequency-generated heating
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Proceedings Volume 3907, Lasers in Surgery: Advanced Characterization, Therapeutics, and Systems X; (2000); doi: 10.1117/12.386263
Event: BiOS 2000 The International Symposium on Biomedical Optics, 2000, San Jose, CA, United States
Abstract
Alteration of the cartilaginous framework within the face and upper airway is a focus of intense clinical research. In this study, radiofrequency (RF) heating was used to induce stress relaxation and reshape mechanically deformed porcine nasal septal cartilage. After RF heating and rehydration, the previously straight cartilage specimens were reshaped into new curved configurations. Two commercial RF devices were used in this study: (1) a 460 kHz device with a series of integrated microthermocouples within the electrode, which allowed monitoring cartilage temperature and (2), a 2.8 MHz device with variable power settings. RF heating duration was determined by measuring the denaturation of albumin to simulate thermal alteration of the cartilage matrix. In cartilage, changes in diffuse transmittance from a diode laser ((lambda) equals 650 nm) during RF heating were measured using a lock-in detection technique, as this correlates with stress relaxation. Alterations in diffuse transmittance were observed during RF generated heating and cartilage was successfully reshaped using both devices, which were objectives of this preliminary study.
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Michael W. Keefe, Brian Jet-Fei Wong, Roger Crumley, "Stress relaxation of porcine septal cartilage during radio-frequency-generated heating", Proc. SPIE 3907, Lasers in Surgery: Advanced Characterization, Therapeutics, and Systems X, (17 May 2000); doi: 10.1117/12.386263; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.386263
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KEYWORDS
Cartilage

Electrodes

Tissues

Transmittance

Radiofrequency generators

Semiconductor lasers

Surgery

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