17 April 2000 Hydrogenated amorphous-silicon-nitride-based photonic light-emitting devices
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Proceedings Volume 3937, Micro- and Nano-photonic Materials and Devices; (2000) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.382796
Event: Symposium on Integrated Optoelectronics, 2000, San Jose, CA, United States
Abstract
We have observed visible photoluminescence from hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride (a-SiNx:H) as well as the enhancement and inhibition of this photoluminescence in a microcavity formed with metallic mirrors. The a-SiNx:H was grown both with and without ammonia. The photoluminescence of the a-SiNx:H microcavity. The distributed Bragg reflector mirrors were fabricated using alternating pairs of quarter wavelength thick silicon oxide and silicon nitride. The photoluminescence is enhanced by at least an order of magnitude at the dielectric a-SiNx:H microcavity resonance at 710 nm. The minimum resonance linewidth is 6 nm, which corresponds to a quality factor of 118. The maximum rejection bandwidth is 150 nm. The enhancement and inhibition of the photoluminescence is understood by the modified photon density of states of the dielectric microcavity. The linewidth of the photoluminescence is also narrowed with respect to the linewidth of the bulk a-SiNx:H, again due to the presence of the electromagnetic modes of the dielectric microcavity. The resonance enhancement and inhibition of the photoluminescence in a-SiNx:H opens up a variety of possibilities for optoelectronic applications such as color flat panel displays or active resonant cavity enhanced devices for wavelength division multiplexing.
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Ali Serpenguzel, "Hydrogenated amorphous-silicon-nitride-based photonic light-emitting devices", Proc. SPIE 3937, Micro- and Nano-photonic Materials and Devices, (17 April 2000); doi: 10.1117/12.382796; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.382796
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