15 May 2000 Representation of color in the modeling of color imaging sensors
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Abstract
Modeling color imaging sensors requires the computation of the amount of electric potential collected within each well of the sensor. This amount is proportional to the integral of the product of the quantum efficiencies of the sensor and the spectral representation of the color of the incident light. Although the quantum efficiencies of any color imaging sensor are available from the data sheets as a function of wavelength, the spectrum of light is generally expressed through a small number of its components along the color matching functions. Since an exact reconstruction of the spectrum of light is not possible from these components, various approximations are used for its reconstruction. In the simplest case, the color matching functions are taken as constants over nonoverlapping regions of the spectrum and as zero outside these regions. The widely used color matching functions are used in the second approach where the components of the spectrum of light along these functions are available. There components are computed in the third approach taking the nonorthogonality of the color matching functions into account. The effects of these approximations are demonstrated with results from the simulation model of a color imaging sensor.
© (2000) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
George Koomullil, George Koomullil, } "Representation of color in the modeling of color imaging sensors", Proc. SPIE 3965, Sensors and Camera Systems for Scientific, Industrial, and Digital Photography Applications, (15 May 2000); doi: 10.1117/12.385455; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.385455
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