12 July 2000 Maximizing operational effectiveness and utility of the Mobile Infrared Scene Projector (MIRSP) during System Integration Laboratory (SIL) testing
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Abstract
Testing advanced weapons systems, like the Comanche helicopter, has always presented technical challenges to the Test and Evaluation (T&E) community. Because these weapon systems are on the cutting edge of technology, it is the tester's responsibility to develop the tools and techniques to fully exercise a new weapon system's capability. As with most testing, state-of-the-art tools which provide test stimuli that matches or exceeds the fidelity of the systems under test must be developed. One such tool under development to test FLIR senors is the Mobile Infrared Scene Projector (MIRSP). This paper will investigate current plans to support the T&E of the Comanche FLIR sensor during SIL testing. Planning the T&E usage of the MIRSP has involved identifying limitations, both in hardware and software, and determining how to minimize the effects of these limitations or proposing solutions to correct these limitations. The final result of this effort is to maximize the operational effectiveness of the MIRSP in order to benefit T&E of all FLIR sensors in the future.
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Kenneth W. Zabel, Geoffrey W. Brooks, Bruce Owens, "Maximizing operational effectiveness and utility of the Mobile Infrared Scene Projector (MIRSP) during System Integration Laboratory (SIL) testing", Proc. SPIE 4027, Technologies for Synthetic Environments: Hardware-in-the-Loop Testing V, (12 July 2000); doi: 10.1117/12.391707; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.391707
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