30 May 2000 Three-dimensional mesh warping for natural eye-to-eye contact in Internet video communication
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Proceedings Volume 4067, Visual Communications and Image Processing 2000; (2000) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.386648
Event: Visual Communications and Image Processing 2000, 2000, Perth, Australia
Abstract
A camera used in video communication over Internet is usually placed on top of a monitor, therefore it is hard for an user to make a natural eye contact with the peer communicator since the user gazes at the monitor, not the camera lens. In this paper, we propose a single 3D mesh warping technique for gaze-correction. It performs 3D rotation of face image by a certain correction angle to obtain a gaze-corrected image. The correction angle is estimated in an unsupervised way by using invariant face feature, and a very simple face section model is used in 3D rotation instead of precise, but not easily attainable in most cases, 3D face models. The method is computationally simple enough to implement for real-time casual video communication applications.
© (2000) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Insuh Lee, Insuh Lee, Byeungwoo Jeon, Byeungwoo Jeon, Jechang Jeong, Jechang Jeong, } "Three-dimensional mesh warping for natural eye-to-eye contact in Internet video communication", Proc. SPIE 4067, Visual Communications and Image Processing 2000, (30 May 2000); doi: 10.1117/12.386648; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.386648
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