18 September 2000 Experimental and analytical characterization of the mechanical performance of disks
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Proceedings Volume 4090, Optical Data Storage 2000; (2000); doi: 10.1117/12.399370
Event: Optical Data Storage, 2000, Whistler, BC, Canada
Abstract
The need for achieving high areal density in data storage devices that are smaller, cheaper and have faster access time has led to a number of new data storage and read-write technologies. Alternate substrate materials are being evaluated in order to achieve these goals. Plastic substrates offer exciting new possibilities in this area. The present study focuses on the understanding of dynamic performance of disks under loads typically seen in data storage applications. The role of substrate material damping in enhancing the dynamic performance is clearly established both analytically and experimentally. Simple analytical models were developed to predict the frequency and displacement of disks under dynamic loading (including the effects of material damping). The loss modulus of the material was identified as the main parameter that controls the damping behavior of the substrate material. The predicted response of the dynamic performance of disks was verified successfully through experiments. Results indicated that the analytical predictions agree well with experiments. The models developed in this study were used to develop materials with enhanced damping characteristics. These materials showed greatly improved vibration response and were comparable to the current substrate (aluminum) material.
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Suresh Subramanian, Ramesh Hariharan, Bernard Landa, Thomas P. Feist, "Experimental and analytical characterization of the mechanical performance of disks", Proc. SPIE 4090, Optical Data Storage 2000, (18 September 2000); doi: 10.1117/12.399370; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.399370
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KEYWORDS
Data storage

Aluminum

Diffractive optical elements

Control systems

Laser Doppler velocimetry

Finite element methods

Manufacturing

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