27 December 2001 Distributed numerical controllers
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Proceedings Volume 4563, Sensors and Controls for Intelligent Manufacturing II; (2001); doi: 10.1117/12.452655
Event: Intelligent Systems and Advanced Manufacturing, 2001, Boston, MA, United States
Abstract
While the basic principles of Numerical Controllers (NC) have not changed much during the years, the implementation of NCs' has changed tremendously. NC equipment has evolved from yesterday's hard-wired specialty control apparatus to today's graphics intensive, networked, increasingly PC based open systems, controlling a wide variety of industrial equipment with positioning needs. One of the newest trends in NC technology is the distributed implementation of the controllers. Distributed implementation promises to offer robustness, lower implementation costs, and a scalable architecture. Historically partitioning has been done along the hierarchical levels, moving individual modules into self contained units. The paper discusses various NC architectures, the underlying technology for distributed implementation, and relevant design issues. First the functional requirements of individual NC modules are analyzed. Module functionality, cycle times, and data requirements are examined. Next the infrastructure for distributed node implementation is reviewed. Various communication protocols and distributed real-time operating system issues are investigated and compared. Finally, a different, vertical system partitioning, offering true scalability and reconfigurability is presented.
© (2001) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Peter E. Orban, "Distributed numerical controllers", Proc. SPIE 4563, Sensors and Controls for Intelligent Manufacturing II, (27 December 2001); doi: 10.1117/12.452655; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.452655
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KEYWORDS
Telecommunications

Control systems

Distributed computing

Operating systems

Clocks

Networks

Real-time computing

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