17 June 2002 Cryogen spray cooling: effects of cryogen film on heat removal and light transmission
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Proceedings Volume 4609, Lasers in Surgery: Advanced Characterization, Therapeutics, and Systems XII; (2002) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.432078
Event: International Symposium on Biomedical Optics, 2002, San Jose, CA, United States
Abstract
Cryogen spray cooling (CSC) is an effective method to minimize epidermal damage during laser treatment of various cutaneous anomalies such as port wine stains, excess hair, and facial rhytides. In this study, we investigated the effects of the cryogen film thickness on heat removal, and laser light transmission through the film. Surfactants were added to the cryogen (R-134a) to decrease the film height by reducing the surface tension, and the resulting heat removal from an in vitro skin phantom was estimated using an algorithm that solved an inverse heat conduction problem. Transmission of light through the cryogen film sprayed onto a glass cover slip was measured by an energy meter at wavelengths of 595, 755, 1064, and 1450 nm. Normalized film height was negatively correlated (r < -0.65) to heat removal for relatively short spraying distances (50 mm). Reducing the cryogen film height may offer an approach to increase heat removal. Values of light transmission were in the range of 70 – 95% for the lasers using various durations of cryogen spurts and delays.
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Brian M. Pikkula, Brian M. Pikkula, Yacov Domankevitz, Yacov Domankevitz, James William Tunnell, James William Tunnell, Bahman Anvari, Bahman Anvari, } "Cryogen spray cooling: effects of cryogen film on heat removal and light transmission", Proc. SPIE 4609, Lasers in Surgery: Advanced Characterization, Therapeutics, and Systems XII, (17 June 2002); doi: 10.1117/12.432078; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.432078
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