17 June 2002 Mechanical properties of repaired liver using an argon beam coagulator with albumin
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Proceedings Volume 4609, Lasers in Surgery: Advanced Characterization, Therapeutics, and Systems XII; (2002) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.438864
Event: International Symposium on Biomedical Optics, 2002, San Jose, CA, United States
Abstract
A new method for tissue soldering using an argon ion beam coagulator (ABC) and human serum albumin is presented. The ABC is widely used in surgery and provides a fast and precise means of achieving hemostasis. In this paper, the mechanical properties of liver and denatured albumin (solder) were measured and the failure methods of liver repaired with albumin were identified. The ultimate tensile strength was measured for healthy liver (N=37) and thermally damaged liver (N=32). The ultimate tensile strength was measured for three concentrations of coagulated albumin (25, 38 and 53%) in a single layer and for two layers of denatured 38% albumin. Failure under tension of argon beam coagulator soldered liver on the parenchymal surface (N=30) with 38% albumin in two layers had a 70% occurrence for tearing at a mean stress of 39 kPa and a 23% occurrence for shearing at a mean stress of 7 kPa. Liver repaired on the interior surface (N=11) failed in tension by tearing (64%) at a mean stress of 34 kPa and by shearing (36%) at a mean stress of 6 kPa. Argon beam coagulator soldering with 38% albumin took 6 s/cm2 for two layers of solder and gave the best balance of usability and strength.
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Theodore P. Moffitt, Deborah A. Baker, Sean J. Kirkpatrick, Scott A. Prahl, "Mechanical properties of repaired liver using an argon beam coagulator with albumin", Proc. SPIE 4609, Lasers in Surgery: Advanced Characterization, Therapeutics, and Systems XII, (17 June 2002); doi: 10.1117/12.438864; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.438864
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