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5 June 2002 Intravital fluorescence microscopic study of the behavior of long-circulating liposomes during microvascular thrombosis
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Proceedings Volume 4623, Functional Monitoring and Drug-Tissue Interaction; (2002) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.469445
Event: International Symposium on Biomedical Optics, 2002, San Jose, CA, United States
Abstract
Treatment of thrombosis depends on the selectivity of thrombolytic agents to the clot. It has been already demonstrated that liposomes can provide a better selectivity of such agents to the clot site. We have recently shown that intravital fluorescence microscopy is a powerful tool to image in situ and in real time the labeling of leukocytes by long circulating liposomes. The aim of this study was to monitor the in vivo behavior of such liposomes in a clot site. Carboxyfluorescein-loaded long circulating liposomes were prepared and characterized in term of size and permeability. The liposomes suspension was injected intravenously to golden hamsters. The skin microcirculation was observed using a dorsal skin-fold chamber by fluorescence microscopy. Thrombosis were obtained as the consequence of the inflammatory response due to the surgery. Using this model, fluorescent dots were observed at the site of the clot. Liposomes accumulate at the clot site whatever the mechanism (passive deposition or uptake). There is a period of latency and 30 seconds after the blood flow stop, fluorescence increases very rapidly and a bright fluorescent spot is observed at the site of the clot. Further studies are needed to determine the exact localization of liposomes in the clot and the mechanism of interaction.
© (2002) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Jean-Marie Dvoisselle, Sylvie Begu, Corine Tourne-Peteilh, Bruno Buys, and Serge R. Mordon "Intravital fluorescence microscopic study of the behavior of long-circulating liposomes during microvascular thrombosis", Proc. SPIE 4623, Functional Monitoring and Drug-Tissue Interaction, (5 June 2002); doi: 10.1117/12.469445; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.469445
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