9 April 2002 LIGO optics: initial and advanced
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Proceedings Volume 4679, Laser-Induced Damage in Optical Materials: 2001; (2002); doi: 10.1117/12.461689
Event: Boulder Damage, 2001, Boulder, CO, United States
Abstract
The LIGO project has completed the installation of large fused silica optical components in the vacuum systems of its observatories. Commissioning work on the Hanford 2 km interferometer has determined an upper limit to the optics losses, allowing comparison with design and pre-installation testing. Planning and development of sapphire optics for the next generation, advanced LIGO detector is now underway, including polishability, optical homogeneity, absorption, and birefringence. The advanced optics development also includes research aimed at lowering coating loss.
© (2002) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Jordan Camp, GariLynn Billingsley, William P. Kells, Albert Lazzarini, Gary H. Sanders, Stanley L. Whitcomb, A. Alexandrovski, Martin M. Fejer, Eric K. Gustafson, Roger K. Route, Sheila Rowan, B Bochner, Gregory M. Harry, Nergis Mavalvala, Rainer Weiss, James Hough, "LIGO optics: initial and advanced", Proc. SPIE 4679, Laser-Induced Damage in Optical Materials: 2001, (9 April 2002); doi: 10.1117/12.461689; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.461689
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KEYWORDS
Coating

LIGO

Sapphire

Absorption

Interferometers

Adaptive optics

Silica

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