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9 May 2002 Separation of malignant and benign masses using maximum-likelihood modeling and neural networks
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Abstract
This study attempted to accurately segment the masses and distinguish malignant from benign tumors. The masses were segmented using a technique that combines pixel aggregation with maximum likelihood analysis. We found that the segmentation method can delineate the tumor body as well as tumor peripheral regions covering typical mass boundaries and some spiculation patterns. We have developed a Multiple Circular Path Convolution Neural Network (MCPCNN) to analyze a set of mass intensity, shape, and texture features for determination of the tumors as malignant or benign. The features were also fed into a conventional neural network for comparison. We also used values obtained from the maximum likelihood values as inputs into a conventional backpropagation neural network. We have tested these methods on 51 mammograms using a grouped Jackknife experiment incorporated with the ROC method. Tumor sizes ranged from 6mm to 3cm. The conventional neural network whose inputs were image features achieved an Az of 0.66. However the MCPCNN achieved an Az value of 0.71. The conventional neural network whose inputs were maximum likelihood values achieved an Az value of 0.84. In addition, the maximum likelihood segmentation method can identify the mass body and boundary regions, which is essential to the analysis of mammographic masses.
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Lisa M. Kinnard, Shih-Chung Benedict Lo, Paul C. Wang, Matthew T. Freedman M.D., and Mohammed F. Chouikha "Separation of malignant and benign masses using maximum-likelihood modeling and neural networks", Proc. SPIE 4684, Medical Imaging 2002: Image Processing, (9 May 2002); https://doi.org/10.1117/12.467216
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