Translator Disclaimer
27 June 2003 CO2 laser soldering of arteriotomy incisions in blood vessels of rats using a temperature-controlled fiber optic system
Author Affiliations +
Abstract
Background and objectives: Conventional methods for microvascular anastomosis are normally based on suturing, using special thin nylon sutures. These methods suffer from major drawbacks, which include: anastomosis, which is not watertight, and sutures or clips that cause an inflammatory response. In order to obtain better results, we introduced a procedure based on CO2 laser soldering. We tested the system on arteriotomy incisions in rat blood vessels, in vivo. Materials and methods: We used a fiber optic based laser soldering system, with a temperature control capability. Arteriotomy incisions of lengths 4±1mm were performed on the femoral arteries of 48 wistar rats: 24 rats in the control group (suture) and 24 rats in the test group (laser soldering). We conducted two follow-up periods: 7 days and 21 days after the surgical procedure, for each group. Flow tests and histology examination were done in order to evaluate the quality of the procedures. Results: The patency rate was 84% for both groups, soldered and sutured. The sutured group showed a significant foreign body reaction (p < 0.05), which was not observed in the soldered group. We found no evidence of thermal damage in the soldered blood vessels. Conclusions: We can conclude that laser soldering is a less traumatic procedure, compared with the conventional suturing technique. It is potentially a faster technique and easier to master.
© (2003) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
David Leshem, Tamar Vasilyev, Avi Ravid, Andrea Gat, Naam Kariv, Abraham Katzir, and Eyal Gur "CO2 laser soldering of arteriotomy incisions in blood vessels of rats using a temperature-controlled fiber optic system", Proc. SPIE 4949, Lasers in Surgery: Advanced Characterization, Therapeutics, and Systems XIII, (27 June 2003); https://doi.org/10.1117/12.485301
PROCEEDINGS
8 PAGES


SHARE
Advertisement
Advertisement
Back to Top