9 May 2003 Fluctuation microscopy: a technique for revealing atomic correlations in structurally noisy (disordered) materials
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Proceedings Volume 5112, Noise as a Tool for Studying Materials; (2003) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.497805
Event: SPIE's First International Symposium on Fluctuations and Noise, 2003, Santa Fe, New Mexico, United States
Abstract
Flunctuation microscopy is a hybrid diffraction-imaging technique that yields information about higher-order correlations between structural units in materials. It has been shown to be well suited for detecting medium rangeorder in atomic positions in amorphous materials. This article presents a review of flunctuation microscopy as employed in a transmission electron microscope for the study of amorphous tetrahedral semiconductors. Possible extensions of the technique to other radiations such as x-rays, and for other structurally noisy materials such as polymers and starches, are discussed.
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Michael M. J. Treacy, Michael M. J. Treacy, J. Murray Gibson, J. Murray Gibson, } "Fluctuation microscopy: a technique for revealing atomic correlations in structurally noisy (disordered) materials", Proc. SPIE 5112, Noise as a Tool for Studying Materials, (9 May 2003); doi: 10.1117/12.497805; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.497805
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