18 June 2004 NIR measurements of glucose in synthetic biological solutions using high-throughput angle-tuned filter spectrometer
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Abstract
A noninvasive blood glucose monitoring device will provide an invaluable tool in the diagnosis and treatment of diabetes. Near infrared (NIR) absorption spectroscopy is one of the most promising optical techniques for in vivo blood glucose sensing to date. Successful realization of such a technology hinges on solving two main problems. First, instrument sensitivity needs to be improved in order to resolve the weak NIR spectral variations due to glucose physiological changes in the blood. Second, interfering signals due to other blood components and tissue changes need to be sufficiently eliminated or compensated for. A simple, low-cost, high-throughput, filter spectrometer optimized for long-wave NIR measurements of biological fluids is developed. The instrument provides noise spectra with a typical rms value of 7 μAU between 2180 nm and 2310 nm with only 5 seconds of data measurement or averaging. Using such an instrument, spectra of aquaeous, synthetic biological solutions containing varying levels of glucose, BSA, triacetin, lactate and urea are obtained. Glucose spectra are isolated, despite the overlapping spectra. Glucose concentrations are predicted with excellent accuracy (SEP≤8.2 mg/dL) using the simple classical least-squares (CLS) and the connonly used partial least-squares (PLS) multivariate techniques.
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Vidi A. Saptari, Vidi A. Saptari, Kamal Youcef-Toumi, Kamal Youcef-Toumi, John Zhang, John Zhang, "NIR measurements of glucose in synthetic biological solutions using high-throughput angle-tuned filter spectrometer", Proc. SPIE 5325, Optical Diagnostics and Sensing IV, (18 June 2004); doi: 10.1117/12.528641; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.528641
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