29 July 2004 Optimization of a state-switched absorber applied to a continuous vibrating system
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Abstract
A state-switched absorber (SSA) is a device that is capable of switching between discrete stiffnesses, thus it is able to instantaneously switch between resonance frequencies. The state-switched absorber is essentially a passive vibration absorber between switch events; however, at each switch event the SSA instantly 'retunes' its natural frequency and maintains that frequency until the next switch event. The SSA has shown improved performance over classical tuned vibration absorbers at reducing the vibration in a base system. This paper considers the optimization of the state-switched absorber applied to a continuous vibrating system. The objective function to be minimized in the state-switching system is the average kinetic energy of the base to which the absorber is attached. Due to the discrete nature of the switch events of the SSA, this objective function is discontinuous as a function of tuning parameters, such as frequency and attachment location. Because of the discontinuities in the objective function, classical gradient-based optimization techniques cannot be employed. To avoid the problem of discontinuities in the objective function, a heuristic approach will be utilized to optimize the state-switched absorber. The optimized performance of the state-switched absorber will be compared to that of an optimized classical tuned vibration absorber. For the entire range of forcing frequencies considered, an SSA has improved performance over a TVA.
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Mark H. Holdhusen, Kenneth A. Cunefare, "Optimization of a state-switched absorber applied to a continuous vibrating system", Proc. SPIE 5386, Smart Structures and Materials 2004: Damping and Isolation, (29 July 2004); doi: 10.1117/12.539876; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.539876
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