21 July 2004 Effect of residual stresses on domain switching in ferroelectric ceramic materials
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Abstract
In this article, an experimental investigation to study the effect of residual stresses on the nonlinear behavior of ferroelectric ceramic material is reported. The effect of residual stresses on the behavior at low electric field and mechanical stress is demonstrated first by showing the large difference in the linear properties measured from strain behavior under mechanical and electrical loading, and resonance method. This is followed by an investigation on the mechanism of polarization reversal due to cyclic electric field. Based on the observed large magnitude of strain and the comparison of the magnitude of the sum of transverse strains with the magnitude of strain in the poling direction it is concluded that polarization reversal due to cyclic electric field in the ferroelectric material at morphotropic phase boundary is the result of two successive 90o domain switchings. Finally, two types of combined loading experiments were conducted to investigate the residual stress and electric field effect on the mechanism of domain switching. The behavior under combined loading showed many new interesting characteristics, and possible mechanisms for such behavior is discussed. While most of the characteristics of the ferroelectric behavior observed in the present experimental study could be explained based on the residual stress state, the understanding of others need further studies.
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Ajit Achuthan, Chin-Teh Sun, "Effect of residual stresses on domain switching in ferroelectric ceramic materials", Proc. SPIE 5387, Smart Structures and Materials 2004: Active Materials: Behavior and Mechanics, (21 July 2004); doi: 10.1117/12.544020; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.544020
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KEYWORDS
Switching

Polarization

Ferroelectric materials

Ceramics

Crystals

Switches

Electrodes

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