8 September 2004 Surface plasmon resonance imaging and versatile surface functionalization for real time comparisons of biochemical interactions
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Abstract
Surface plasmon resonance imaging is an optical method that allows the real time detection of small changes in the physical properties of a dielectric medium near a metallic surface. Using proper surface functionalization and structuration, this technique can be applied to the realization of optical biochips where multiple unlabeled interactions can be monitored. More precisely, thanks to the use of an adequate optical set-up built around a gold surface realized by self assembled monolayers or electrocopolymerization, we studied DNA:DNA interactions with potential application to genetic diagnostic and DNA:protein interactions to demonstrate the ability of the system to determine simultaneously different affinity constants.
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Emmanuel Maillart, Emmanuel Maillart, Nathalie Bassil, Nathalie Bassil, Pierre Lecaruyer, Pierre Lecaruyer, Michael Canva, Michael Canva, Yves Levy, Yves Levy, } "Surface plasmon resonance imaging and versatile surface functionalization for real time comparisons of biochemical interactions", Proc. SPIE 5461, Biophotonics New Frontier: From Genome to Proteome, (8 September 2004); doi: 10.1117/12.554998; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.554998
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