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29 September 2004 Handling and transporting the 8.4-m mirrors for the Large Binocular Telescope
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Abstract
The Large Binocular Telescope has two 8.4 meter mirrors, one of which is now in the telescope. Handling and moving the 8.4-meter honeycomb mirrors calls for moving 16 metric ton mirrors while maintaining very low stresses. We have now handled the first LBT mirror off the furnace, turned on edge, cleaned out, turned upside down, on the grinder, turned again, put on a polishing cell, moved under the polishing machine, lifted with a vacuum lifting fixture, moved to the telescope cell, to a transportation box, down the highway, onto a multi-axle trailer on edge, up Mount Graham, into the telescope building, back into the telescope cell and up through a hatch onto the telescope itself. The second LBT mirror is in the polishing stage. We have designed and manufactured many pieces of specialized equipment to handle the task. This equipment must be able to handle the mirrors without exceeding 0.7 MPa (100 psi) stress in the glass.
© (2004) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Warren B. Davison, Stephen H. Warner, Joseph T. Williams, Randall D. Lutz, John M. Hill, and Jim H. Slagle "Handling and transporting the 8.4-m mirrors for the Large Binocular Telescope", Proc. SPIE 5495, Astronomical Structures and Mechanisms Technology, (29 September 2004); https://doi.org/10.1117/12.549808
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