29 December 2004 Nanostructure-engineered chemical sensors for hazardous gas and vapor detection
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Proceedings Volume 5593, Nanosensing: Materials and Devices; (2004) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.570528
Event: Optics East, 2004, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
Abstract
A nanosensor technology has been developed using nanostructures, such as single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and metal oxides nanowires or nanobelts, on a pair of interdigitated electrodes (IDE) processed with a siliconbased microfabrication and micromachining technique. The IDE fingers were fabricated using thin film metallization techniques. Both in-situ growth of nanostructure materials and casting of the nanostructure dispersions were used to make chemical sensing devices. These sensors have been exposed to hazardous gases and vapors, such as acetone, benzene, chlorine, and ammonia in the concentration range of ppm to ppb at room temperature. The electronic molecular sensing in our sensor platform can be understood by electron modulation between the nanostructure engineered device and gas molecules. As a result of the electron modulation, the conductance of nanodevice will change. Due to the large surface area, low surface energy barrier and high thermal and mechanical stability, nanostructured chemical sensors potentially can offer higher sensitivity, lower power consumption and better robustness than the state-of-the-art systems, which make them more attractive for defense and space applications. Combined with MEMS technology, light weight and compact size sensors can be made in wafer scale with low cost.
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Jing Li, Jing Li, Yijiang Lu, Yijiang Lu, "Nanostructure-engineered chemical sensors for hazardous gas and vapor detection", Proc. SPIE 5593, Nanosensing: Materials and Devices, (29 December 2004); doi: 10.1117/12.570528; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.570528
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