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3 June 2005 Development of a second-generation novel UVR sensor for the quantification of the light field at the anterior ocular surface
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Abstract
Research has shown in recent years that acute and cumulative exposure to excessive ultraviolet radiation (UVR) can cause a range of degenerative ocular conditions such as pterygium, photokeratitis and pinguecula. The increase in natural solar UVR as a result of the depletion of the ozone layer has led to a greater awareness of the adverse effects of UVR on the anterior ocular surface tissues. The relevance of this lies in the fact that these tissues are not immune to photodamage and that there is selective absorption of UVR by conjunctival and corneal tissue in the anterior ocular surface. Therefore, there is a demand for more precise quantification and localisation of UVR incidence at the anterior ocular surface. A novel solar blind photodiode sensor array has been designed, constructed and tested for this purpose. The emphasis of the measurements made by this sensor system is the acquisition of real time, field based surveys of the ocular UVR light field in a broad range of insolation environments. These data will then provide a thorough database of UVR irradiances that can be related to induced damage of anterior ocular tissue. Results to date show the first measured, in-vivo, absolute UVR levels on the eye, the corresponding relative field across the eye and the presence of nasal-temporal biases that exist.
© (2005) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
David Fleming, James E. Walsh, Linda Moore, Jan P. G. Bergmanson, and David McMahon "Development of a second-generation novel UVR sensor for the quantification of the light field at the anterior ocular surface", Proc. SPIE 5826, Opto-Ireland 2005: Optical Sensing and Spectroscopy, (3 June 2005); https://doi.org/10.1117/12.605125
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