12 April 2005 Drop-test study of parachute textile with embedded fiber optic sensors
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Proceedings Volume 5852, Third International Conference on Experimental Mechanics and Third Conference of the Asian Committee on Experimental Mechanics; (2005); doi: 10.1117/12.621419
Event: Third International Conference on Experimental Mechanics and Third Conference of the Asian Committee on Experimental Mechanics, 2004, -, Singapore
Abstract
We developed here a novel embedded strain measurement system that fulfilled a dynamic analysis of the characteristics of parachute canopy based on fiber optics technology. As a continue study of the dynamic characteristics of the parachute canopy, a series of drop tests were developed in the laboratory, and followed by the field test. Sample results obtained by both mode power distribution (MPD) system and fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors are taken into the comparison between the optical and mechanical testing results. Drop test results from both MPD and FBG sensors were analysis and correlated to the mechanical characteristics of the parachute canopy textile based on the previous relatins derived from quasi-static test. The curves show clearly that the results of the two types of sensors are consistent. The achieved results provided a nice correlation between the optical and mechanical signals, which dues primarily to the model built up in previous quasi-static test, and will be discussed in this paper.
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Min Li, Yulin Li, "Drop-test study of parachute textile with embedded fiber optic sensors", Proc. SPIE 5852, Third International Conference on Experimental Mechanics and Third Conference of the Asian Committee on Experimental Mechanics, (12 April 2005); doi: 10.1117/12.621419; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.621419
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KEYWORDS
Sensors

Fiber Bragg gratings

Fiber optics sensors

Fiber optics

Calibration

Finite element methods

Sensing systems

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