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14 October 2005 Optical design and cryogenic mounting of the optics for a pyramid waterfront sensor working in the near infrared wavelength range
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Abstract
This paper describes the whole process of designing, manufacturing and assembling the optics for an infrared pyramid wavefront sensor, called PYRAMIR. This sensor is built to work with the adaptive optical system at the 3.5 m telescope of the Calar Alto Observatory, Spain, which controls a 97 actuator deformable mirror. PYRAMIR is working in combination with an infrared science camera, which is used for observations. Since the wavefront sensor works in the near infrared (1.0 μm to 2.4 μm), the detector, the optics and all the mechanics are cooled to liquid nitrogen temperature. For this cryogenic condition, special care has to be taken for the optical design and the mounting of the lenses. We describe in detail the process from infrared optical design and cryo-mechanical engineering, to the final assembly of the opto-mechanical units and testing in the lab. Technical solutions are illustrated and the final performance is demonstrated.
© (2005) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
P. Bizenberger, H. Baumeister, J. Büchler Costa, and D. Peter "Optical design and cryogenic mounting of the optics for a pyramid waterfront sensor working in the near infrared wavelength range", Proc. SPIE 5962, Optical Design and Engineering II, 596227 (14 October 2005); doi: 10.1117/12.639285; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.639285
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