30 January 2006 Integral videography of high-density light field with spherical layout camera array
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Abstract
We propose a spherical layout for a camera array system when shooting images for use in Integral Videography (IV). IV is an autostereoscopic video image technique based on Integral Photography (IP) and is one of the preferred autostereoscopic techniques for displaying images. There are many studies on autostereoscopic displays based on this technique indicating its potential advantages. Other camera arrays have been studied, but their purpose addressed other issues, such as acquiring high-resolution images, capturing a light field, creating contents for non-IV-based autostereoscopic displays and so on. Moreover, IV displays images with high stereoscopic resolution when objects are displayed close to the display. As a consequence, we have to capture high-resolution images in close vicinity to the display. We constructed the spherical layout for the camera array system using 30 cameras arranged in a 6 by 5 array. Each camera had an angular difference of 6 degrees, and we set the cameras to the direction of the sphere center. These cameras can synchronously capture movies. The resolution of the cameras is a 640 by 480. With this system, we determined the effectiveness of the proposed layout of cameras and actually captured IP images, and displayed real autostereoscopic images.
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Takafumi Koike, Takafumi Koike, Michio Oikawa, Michio Oikawa, Nobutaka Kimura, Nobutaka Kimura, Fumiko Beniyama, Fumiko Beniyama, Toshio Moriya, Toshio Moriya, Masami Yamasaki, Masami Yamasaki, } "Integral videography of high-density light field with spherical layout camera array", Proc. SPIE 6055, Stereoscopic Displays and Virtual Reality Systems XIII, 605510 (30 January 2006); doi: 10.1117/12.641334; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.641334
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