6 July 2006 Review of Corning's capabilities for ULE mirror blank manufacturing for an extremely large telescope
Author Affiliations +
Abstract
The next generation of large ground based astronomical telescopes will have their primary mirrors, and in some cases secondary mirrors, built using a segmented approach. Corning has the capacity and capability to produce mirror segment blanks from Corning ULEThe next generation of large ground based astronomical telescopes will have their primary mirrors, and in some cases secondary mirrors, built using a segmented approach. Corning has the capacity and capability to produce mirror segment blanks from Corning ULE® titania-silica glass in segment sizes ranging from 1.0- meter to 1.8-meters flat to flat (1.2-meter to 2.1-meter point to point). Corning also has the capability of producing large monolithic mirrors for use in secondary, tertiary and/or other mirror blanks up to 8.5-meters in diameter. This paper will review and further discuss the material and processes employed by Corning to produce several hundred to several thousand mirror segment blanks for extremely large telescopes, along with large monolithic mirror blanks for downstream optics, titania-silica glass in segment sizes ranging from 1.0- meter to 1.8-meters flat to flat (1.2-meter to 2.1-meter point to point). Corning also has the capability of producing large monolithic mirrors for use in secondary, tertiary and/or other mirror blanks up to 8.5-meters in diameter. This paper will review and further discuss the material and processes employed by Corning to produce several hundred to several thousand mirror segment blanks for extremely large telescopes, along with large monolithic mirror blanks for downstream optics.
© (2006) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Randy R. VanBrocklin, Randy R. VanBrocklin, Mary J. Edwards, Mary J. Edwards, Bruce Wells, Bruce Wells, } "Review of Corning's capabilities for ULE mirror blank manufacturing for an extremely large telescope", Proc. SPIE 6273, Optomechanical Technologies for Astronomy, 627301 (6 July 2006); doi: 10.1117/12.672034; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.672034
PROCEEDINGS
11 PAGES


SHARE
Back to Top