13 October 2006 A new method for measuring elastic constants of limited-size materials and the errors analysis
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Proceedings Volume 6280, Third International Symposium on Precision Mechanical Measurements; 62803O (2006); doi: 10.1117/12.716325
Event: Third International Symposium on Precision Mechanical Measurements, 2006, Urumqi, China
Abstract
A new method of measuring elastic constants of limited-size materials is presented in this paper. The measurement is based on acoustic microscope technology. The material elastic constants are determined by measuring longitudinal wave and leak surface wave velocity simultaneously by the system with a line-focus PVDF transducer developed by ourselves. Based on the virtual instrument technology, a set of precise measure software was programmed. Experimental tests on three limited-size samples, aluminum, cuprum and steel, were carried out using the line-focus PVDF transducers and automatically measure software. The experimental results indicate that the ultrasonic measurement system can be used to determine the elastic constants of limited-size materials accurately. The main factors to affect the precision of elastic constants were discussed, including the measuring error of defocus distance, thickness and time interval. Take Young's modulus of aluminum for an example, the qualitative analysis of the errors sources influence on the measure system was made. This method is suitable not only to measuring elastic constants of isotropy materials, but also those of anisotropic ones.
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Guorong Song, Xiaoling Wei, Cunfu He, Bin Wu, "A new method for measuring elastic constants of limited-size materials and the errors analysis", Proc. SPIE 6280, Third International Symposium on Precision Mechanical Measurements, 62803O (13 October 2006); doi: 10.1117/12.716325; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.716325
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KEYWORDS
Ultrasonics

Error analysis

Transducers

Aluminum

Ferroelectric polymers

Mechanics

Electronics

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