7 August 2007 LANTCET: laser nanotechnology for screening and treating tumors ex vivo and in vivo
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Proceedings Volume 6735, International Conference on Lasers, Applications, and Technologies 2007: High-Power Lasers and Applications; 673516 (2007) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.753356
Event: International Conference on Lasers, Applications, and Technologies '07, 2007, Minsk, Belarus
Abstract
LANTCET (laser-activated nano-thermolysis as cell elimination technology) was developed for selective detection and destruction of individual tumor cells through generation of photothermal bubbles around clusters of light absorbing gold nanoparticles (nanorods and nanoshells) that are selectively formed in target tumor cells. We have applied bare nanoparticles and their conjugates with cell-specific vectors such as monoclonal antibodies CD33 (specific for Acute Myeloid Leukemia) and C225 (specific for carcinoma cells that express epidermal growth factor -EGF). Clusters were formed by using vector-receptor interactions with further clusterization of nanoparticles due to endocytosis. Formation of clusters was verified directly with optical resonance scattering microscopy and microspectroscopy. LANTCET method was tested in vitro for living cell samples with: (1) model myeloid K562 cells (CD33 positive), (2) primary human bone marrow CD33-positive blast cells from patients with the diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia, (3) monolayers of living EGF-positive carcinoma cells (Hep-2C), (4) human lymphocytes and red blood cells as normal cells. The LANTCET method was also tested in vivo using rats with experimental polymorphic sarcoma. Photothermal bubbles were generated and detected in vitro with a photothermal microscope equipped with a tunable Ti-Sa pulsed laser. We have found that cluster formation caused an almost 100-fold decrease in the bubble generation threshold of laser pulse fluence in tumor cells compared to the bubble generation threshold for normal cells. The animal tumor that was treated with a single laser pulse showed a necrotic area of diameter close to the pump laser beam diameter and a depth of 1-2 mm. Cell level selectivity of tumor damage with single laser pulse was demonstrated. Combining lightscattering imaging with bubble imaging, we introduced a new image-guided mode of the LANTCET operation for screening and treatment of tumors ex vivo and in vivo.
© (2007) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Dmitri O. Lapotko, Ekaterina Y. Lukianova-Hleb, Sergei A. Zhdanok, Jason H. Hafner, Betty C. Rostro, Peter Scully, Marina Konopleva, Michael Andreeff, Chun Li, Ehab Y. Hanna, Jeffrey N. Myers, Alexander A. Oraevsky, "LANTCET: laser nanotechnology for screening and treating tumors ex vivo and in vivo", Proc. SPIE 6735, International Conference on Lasers, Applications, and Technologies 2007: High-Power Lasers and Applications, 673516 (7 August 2007); doi: 10.1117/12.753356; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.753356
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