22 April 2008 Astrobiology at different wavelengths
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Proceedings Volume 6986, Extremely Large Telescopes: Which Wavelengths? Retirement Symposium for Arne Ardeberg; 69860D (2008) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.801265
Event: Extremely Large Telescopes: Which Wavelengths? Retirement Symposium for Arne Ardeberg, 2007, Lund, Sweden
Abstract
Astrobiology is a new discipline that promises to answer one of mankind's so-called 'great questions', that is whether we are alone in the Universe. In order to do so, new technologies are required since the key element is to detects signs of life - biomarkers - at interstellar distances. If we are going to be able to do so from the ground or if we will have to deploy instruments in space is still somewhat un-clear. The issue is complex, and at the heart of the matter is the question of which wavelengths will be suitable.
© (2008) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
C. V. M. Fridlund, C. V. M. Fridlund, } "Astrobiology at different wavelengths", Proc. SPIE 6986, Extremely Large Telescopes: Which Wavelengths? Retirement Symposium for Arne Ardeberg, 69860D (22 April 2008); doi: 10.1117/12.801265; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.801265
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