23 July 2008 The cryogenic system for the VIRUS array of spectrographs on the Hobby-Eberly Telescope
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Abstract
The Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) is an existing innovative large telescope of 9.2 meter aperture, located at the McDonald Observatory in West Texas. The Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX) requires a major upgrade to the HET, including a substantial increase in the telescope field of view, as well as the development and integration of a revolutionary new integral field spectrograph called VIRUS. The Visible Integral-Field Replicable Unit Spectrograph (VIRUS) is an instrument comprising approximately 150 individual IFU-fed spectrographs which will be mounted on the telescope structure. Each spectrograph has a CDD camera detector package which must be cryogenically cooled during scientific operation. In order to cool each of these camera systems a liquid nitrogen system has been proposed and design study completed. The proposed system includes: a liquid nitrogen source, vacuum jacket distribution system, local storage on the telescope, and distribution under a thermal siphon to the individual spectrographs and local thermal connectors.
© (2008) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Michael P. Smith, Michael P. Smith, George T. Mulholland, George T. Mulholland, John A. Booth, John A. Booth, John M. Good, John M. Good, Gary J. Hill, Gary J. Hill, Phillip J MacQueen, Phillip J MacQueen, Marc D. Rafal, Marc D. Rafal, Richard D. Savage, Richard D. Savage, Brian L. Vattiat, Brian L. Vattiat, } "The cryogenic system for the VIRUS array of spectrographs on the Hobby-Eberly Telescope", Proc. SPIE 7018, Advanced Optical and Mechanical Technologies in Telescopes and Instrumentation, 70184M (23 July 2008); doi: 10.1117/12.790236; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.790236
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