6 May 2009 Novel, real-time standoff detection of explosives and other substances concealed under clothing, integrated into standard TV images via data fusion
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Abstract
A novel and low-cost technique of standoff detection is presented that permits the detection of explosives and other contraband substances that are hidden under clothing at standoff distances . The technique uses NIR beams of wavelengths found in ordinary domestic remote controls, combined with various signal recovery techniques commonly used in astronomy. This alternative technique, whilst sophisticated, utilises readily available optoelectronic components. It is inherently far more portable than currently available commercial alternatives and is easy to use. A pre-production prototype successfully detected and identified the common homemade explosives, ammonium nitrate and hydrogen peroxide, which were concealed behind clothing from a distance of 5 metres under daytime conditions. In principle, this distance could be extended as far as 50 metres without a significant increase in cost or complexity. Another advantage of this device is that apart from providing standoff chemical signatures and analyses of concealed substances, this it can simultaneously superimpose the chemical information on top of a normal TV image in a data fusion approach; that is, an image appears on the screen , the area/subject of interest can be zoomed in on and enlarged and a representation of a chemical spectrum appears on the screen underneath the image. A supplemental technique is also reported upon that, under the appropriate circumstances, enable actual imaging of concealed objects to be accomplished.
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G. G. Diamond, R. B. Gohel, "Novel, real-time standoff detection of explosives and other substances concealed under clothing, integrated into standard TV images via data fusion", Proc. SPIE 7298, Infrared Technology and Applications XXXV, 72983S (6 May 2009); doi: 10.1117/12.829084; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.829084
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