9 May 2009 Utility of an airframe referenced spatial auditory display for general aviation operations
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Abstract
The University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) completed flight testing with an airframe-referenced localized audio cueing display. The purpose was to assess its affect on pilot performance, workload, and situational awareness in two scenarios simulating single-pilot general aviation operations under instrument meteorological conditions. Each scenario consisted of 12 test procedures conducted under simulated instrument meteorological conditions, half with the cue off, and half with the cue on. Simulated aircraft malfunctions were strategically inserted at critical times during each test procedure. Ten pilots participated in the study; half flew a moderate workload scenario consisting of point to point navigation and holding pattern operations and half flew a high workload scenario consisting of non precision approaches and missed approach procedures. Flight data consisted of aircraft and navigation state parameters, NASA Task Load Index (TLX) assessments, and post-flight questionnaires. With localized cues there was slightly better pilot technical performance, a reduction in workload, and a perceived improvement in situational awareness. Results indicate that an airframe-referenced auditory display has utility and pilot acceptance in general aviation operations.
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M. Hassan Naqvi, Alan J. Wigdahl, Richard J. Ranaudo, "Utility of an airframe referenced spatial auditory display for general aviation operations", Proc. SPIE 7327, Display Technologies and Applications for Defense, Security, and Avionics III, 73270G (9 May 2009); doi: 10.1117/12.818253; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.818253
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KEYWORDS
3D displays

Navigation systems

Situational awareness sensors

3D acquisition

Error analysis

Global Positioning System

Environmental sensing

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