21 August 2009 SPIRALE: the first all-Cesic® telescopes orbiting earth
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Abstract
SPIRALE is a French Earth observation demonstration project consisting of two satellites. In support of the project and under contract with Thales Alenia Space, ECM manufactured two fully integrated all-Cesic® telescopes, composed of super-light-weighted complex monolithic structures, including two off-axis aspheric mirrors per telescope with integrated interfaces for mounting. The all-Cesic telescope assembly was tested under shock and vibration loads, and by exposure to realistic in-flight thermal environments. In this paper we describe the space-qualified process of manufacturing such high-precision space telescopes based on our Cesic® technology; the advantages of our Cesic® technology compared to traditional materials, such as metals or glass ceramics; and some of the test results. This project demonstrates that all-Cesic® telescopes have great potential for future space applications, especially under cryogenic conditions, due to their athermal characteristics and the great versatility of the Cesic® manufacturing process.
© (2009) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Matthias R. Krödel, Matthias R. Krödel, Christophe Devilliers, Christophe Devilliers, } "SPIRALE: the first all-Cesic® telescopes orbiting earth", Proc. SPIE 7425, Optical Materials and Structures Technologies IV, 74250F (21 August 2009); doi: 10.1117/12.825894; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.825894
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