18 September 2009 Evaluating crop land productivity using MODIS derived time serious field greenness and water index in North China Plain
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Abstract
Mapping grain crop land productivity that associated soil quality and crop field management are needed over intensively cropped regions such as the North China Plain to support science and policy application focused on understanding the current and potential capacity of regional food support. In this study, the crop growth dynamic presenting by time series field Greenness derived from MODIS 250 m data and soil moisture condition assessing by Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI) derived by MODIS 250 m and 500 m data were combined to detect the temporal and spatial variability of productivity of winter wheat-summer maize field in the period 2000 to 2008 in Hebei and Shandong Province in North China Plain. Annual average NDVI levels, average levels of nine years and coefficients of variation of levels in the main growing season indicated corresponding crop growth condition and clearly presented spatial distribution of crop growth. Both the levels of NDWI and the coefficients of variation of the levels have almost same pattern of spatial distribution and correlations between two indexes levels were very high. The results of analysis of levels and coefficients of variation of levels of NDVI and NDWI shows the combination analysis of two indexes can be used to assess the levels of land productivity with a high spatial or temporal resolution .
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Zhen Wang, Yunqiao Shu, Shengwei Zhang, Hongjun Li, Yuping Lei, "Evaluating crop land productivity using MODIS derived time serious field greenness and water index in North China Plain", Proc. SPIE 7472, Remote Sensing for Agriculture, Ecosystems, and Hydrology XI, 747229 (18 September 2009); doi: 10.1117/12.830775; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.830775
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