31 December 2010 The measurement of bicycle exercising energy transfer
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Proceedings Volume 7544, Sixth International Symposium on Precision Engineering Measurements and Instrumentation; 75444D (2010); doi: 10.1117/12.886241
Event: Sixth International Symposium on Precision Engineering Measurements and Instrumentation, 2010, Hangzhou, China
Abstract
The main study purpose is to develop a device capable of translating exercise energy into hot or icy drinkable water. This device can accurately measure energy consumption during exercise, transform it, and apply it to a heating and refrigerating system. Traditional energy measurements were based on the amount of exercise load from the human body. The research tapped into this non-electric form of energy transmission to run a heating and refrigerating system. The energy requirement was 50.6 kcal. When compared to 57.9 kcal, which the body consumes based actual calorie test, the difference was within a 15% striking range. In terms of energy comparisons, this study demonstrates potential R & D value with this innovative design. It complied with carbon emission requirements by producing 2,000 cc of energy at 47°C of hot water and 1,300 cc of energy at 6.6°C of ice water, all without the use of conventional energy sources. As the paper shows, this device is an innovative and environmentally conscious design. In an upcoming low-carbon emissions future, its research potential is definitely worth evaluating.
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Hung-Pin Cho, Zi-Jie Jian, Ching-Song Jwo, Jiun-Yau Wang, Sih-Li Chen, "The measurement of bicycle exercising energy transfer", Proc. SPIE 7544, Sixth International Symposium on Precision Engineering Measurements and Instrumentation, 75444D (31 December 2010); doi: 10.1117/12.886241; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.886241
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KEYWORDS
Oxygen

Energy efficiency

Energy transfer

Measurement devices

Temperature metrology

Manufacturing

Carbon

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