16 February 2010 Applications of fluorescence spectroscopy to problems of food safety: detection of fecal contamination and of the presence of central nervous system tissue and diagnosis of neurological disease
Author Affiliations +
Abstract
Applications of fluorescence spectroscopy that enable the real-time or rapid detection of fecal contamination on beef carcasses and the presence of central nervous system tissue in meat products are discussed. The former is achieved by employing spectroscopic signatures of chlorophyll metabolites; the latter, by exploiting the characteristic structure and intensity of lipofuscin in central nervous system tissue. The success of these techniques has led us to investigate the possibility of diagnosing scrapie in sheep by obtaining fluorescence spectra of the retina. Crucial to this diagnosis is the ability to obtain baseline correlations of lipofuscin fluorescence with age. A murine model was employed as a proof of principle of this correlation.
© (2010) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Ramkrishna Adhikary, Sayantan Bose, Thomas A. Casey, Al Gapsch, Mark A. Rasmussen, Jacob W. Petrich, "Applications of fluorescence spectroscopy to problems of food safety: detection of fecal contamination and of the presence of central nervous system tissue and diagnosis of neurological disease", Proc. SPIE 7576, Reporters, Markers, Dyes, Nanoparticles, and Molecular Probes for Biomedical Applications II, 757617 (16 February 2010); doi: 10.1117/12.841829; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.841829
PROCEEDINGS
15 PAGES


SHARE
Back to Top