29 July 2010 EXIST deep observations of the Galactic Center Region
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Abstract
The EXIST observatory planned for launch in the next decade will carry outstanding contributions in both Galactic and Extragalactic science with a sensitivity about 10-20 better respect to the flown hard X-ray missions and full sky survey capability. Designed mainly for the survey of SMBH and transients, thanks to the wide field of view (~70x90deg) and large effective area of the High Energy Telescope (HET), the study of spectra and variability at all timescales of all types of Galactic sources will be made possible. EXIST will be also capable to study in detail the Galactic Center (GC) in the hard X-rays. This crowded region as observed recently by Chandra, Integral and Swift has been found to possibly host a high number of high energy sources. In this work we report on the capabilities of EXIST to image the GC region and to detect and characterize the different classes of sources on the basis of their known spectral and variability properties. EXIST will perform the crucial observation tests to study the emission from Sgr A*, using the simultaneous observations of IR and X-ray flares, searching for periodicity to study the Keplerian flow with NIR and/or X QPO, confirm or not the high energy counterpart of SgrA* detected by INTEGRAL and define the spectral shape of the high energy tail. Finally, EXIST can effectively and continuously monitor spectra from Sgr B2 to confirm the correlation of the iron line emission with the hard X-ray continuum and establish its origin.
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M. Fiocchi, L. Natalucci, J. E. Grindlay, P. Ubertini, A. Bazzano, "EXIST deep observations of the Galactic Center Region", Proc. SPIE 7732, Space Telescopes and Instrumentation 2010: Ultraviolet to Gamma Ray, 773220 (29 July 2010); doi: 10.1117/12.857023; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.857023
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