19 July 2010 Lightweight high-performance 1-4 meter class spaceborne mirrors: emerging technology for demanding spaceborne requirements
Author Affiliations +
Abstract
Pending critical spaceborne requirements, including coronagraphic detection of exoplanets, require exceptionally smooth mirror surfaces, aggressive lightweighting, and low-risk cost-effective optical manufacturing methods. Simultaneous development at Schott for production of aggressively lightweighted (>90%) Zerodur® mirror blanks, and at L-3 Brashear for producing ultra-smooth surfaces on Zerodur®, will be described. New L-3 techniques for large-mirror optical fabrication include Computer Controlled Optical Surfacing (CCOS) pioneered at L-3 Tinsley, and the world's largest MRF machine in place at L-3 Brashear. We propose that exceptional mirrors for the most critical spaceborne applications can now be produced with the technologies described.
© (2010) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Tony Hull, Peter Hartmann, Andrew R. Clarkson, John M. Barentine, Ralf Jedamzik, Thomas Westerhoff, "Lightweight high-performance 1-4 meter class spaceborne mirrors: emerging technology for demanding spaceborne requirements", Proc. SPIE 7739, Modern Technologies in Space- and Ground-based Telescopes and Instrumentation, 77390C (19 July 2010); doi: 10.1117/12.857900; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.857900
PROCEEDINGS
14 PAGES


SHARE
KEYWORDS
Mirrors

Space telescopes

Polishing

Telescopes

Zerodur

James Webb Space Telescope

Glasses

RELATED CONTENT

Glass Choice Procedures For Periscope Design
Proceedings of SPIE (October 20 1986)
Resonators for high-power lasers
Proceedings of SPIE (December 22 1998)
BATMAN: a DMD-based MOS demonstrator on Galileo Telescope
Proceedings of SPIE (September 24 2012)
Laser Scanning of Experimental Solar Cells
Proceedings of SPIE (November 25 1980)

Back to Top