22 February 2011 In vivo monitoring of vessel density pattern in skin phantoms for the application of early sign of shock detection by using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy
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Proceedings Volume 7890, Advanced Biomedical and Clinical Diagnostic Systems IX; 789009 (2011); doi: 10.1117/12.874208
Event: SPIE BiOS, 2011, San Francisco, California, United States
Abstract
Medical shock is still a common cause for the unacceptably high mortality rate in trauma patient in Intensive Care Units (ICU), because limitations of the monitoring/ diagnostic techniques and short time span of shock development. In this paper we introduce a method for monitoring of the vessel density spatial pattern, using spatially resolved diffuse reflectance measurement. The setup contains a spatially resolved optical fiber probe coupled to supersensitive spectrometer and high power light source. The experiment was done on skin tissue phantom model containing grid pattern which mimicks optical properties of the skin and capillary network. The spatially resolved diffuse reflectance spectra are collected over the phantom with various detector to source distance. The measured spatially resolved diffuse reflectance spectra were analyzed yielding grid spatial pattern. This novel technique of the vessel density spatial pattern monitoring will help to detect the early signs of shock development in intensive care units.
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Rajesh Kanawade, Gennadi Sayko, Michael Schmidt, Alexandre Douplik, "In vivo monitoring of vessel density pattern in skin phantoms for the application of early sign of shock detection by using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy", Proc. SPIE 7890, Advanced Biomedical and Clinical Diagnostic Systems IX, 789009 (22 February 2011); doi: 10.1117/12.874208; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.874208
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KEYWORDS
Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

Capillaries

Sensors

Skin

Tissue optics

Blood

Light sources

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