16 March 2011 An investigation of an application specific PET prototype with inhomogeneous-energy resolution detectors
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Abstract
Designed for general purpose with nearly fixed performance, traditional PET systems are constructed with almost identical and unmovable detectors. In this work, we are developing an application specific PET with detectors with inhomogeneous performances, which can be adaptively rearranged for different objects and regions of interest (ROIs). This article reports our initial investigation on a prototype system consisting of inhomogeneous detectors with two levels of energy resolution. In this system, the high performance detectors and the normal performance detectors are arranged in one scanner, and the high performance detectors are continuous distributed on the scanner. A liver phantom is constructed as our object of detection. The coincidence data and image quality are analyzed with different distribution schemes of the high performance detectors. Preliminary results indicate that the proposed prototype obtains higher true counts and lower scatter counts than the system with normal performance detectors, resulting in lower scatter fractions for every region and the whole object. The extent of the reduction of scatter fraction is varied with different distribution schemes of the high performance detectors, which is related to the distribution of activity. Better signal-to-noise ratio for every region in the object and better percent contrast are also obtained in some schemes of the high performance detectors.
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Jingjing Liu, Qingguo Xie, and Lu Wan "An investigation of an application specific PET prototype with inhomogeneous-energy resolution detectors", Proc. SPIE 7961, Medical Imaging 2011: Physics of Medical Imaging, 79614A (16 March 2011); doi: 10.1117/12.878462; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.878462
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