14 April 2011 Streicker Bridge: a comparison between Bragg-grating long-gauge strain and temperature sensors and Brillouin scattering-based distributed strain and temperature sensors
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Abstract
The Streicker Bridge at Princeton University campus has been equipped with two fiber-optic sensing technologies: discrete long-gauge sensing, based on Fiber Bragg-Gratings (FBG), and truly-distributed sensing, based on Brillouin Optical Time Domain Analysis (BOTDA). The sensors were embedded in concrete during the construction. The early age measurements, including hydration swelling and contraction, and post-tensioning of concrete were registered by both systems and placed side by side in order to compare their performances. Aside from the usual behavior, an unusual increase in strain was detected by several sensors in various cross-sections. The nature of this event is still under investigation, but preliminary study indicates early-age cracking as the cause. The comparison between the two monitoring systems shows good agreement in the areas where no unusual behavior was detected, but some discrepancies are noticed at locations where unusual behavior occurred and during the early age of concrete. These discrepancies are attributed to the spatial resolution of the distributed monitoring system and the temperature influences at early age. In this paper, general information concerning the Streicker Bridge project is given. The monitoring systems and their specifications are briefly presented. The monitoring data are analyzed and a comparison between the two systems is performed.
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Branko Glisic, Branko Glisic, Jeremy Chen, Jeremy Chen, David Hubbell, David Hubbell, } "Streicker Bridge: a comparison between Bragg-grating long-gauge strain and temperature sensors and Brillouin scattering-based distributed strain and temperature sensors", Proc. SPIE 7981, Sensors and Smart Structures Technologies for Civil, Mechanical, and Aerospace Systems 2011, 79812C (14 April 2011); doi: 10.1117/12.881818; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.881818
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