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13 September 2011 Image exploitation from encoded measurements
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Abstract
We consider a coded aperture imaging system which collects far fewer measurements than the underlying resolution of the scene we wish to exploit. Our sensing model considers an imaging system which subsamples pixel intensities with a SLM device. The theory of compressive imaging has been studied in the context of rebuilding high resolution imagery from a smaller set of image measurements, and thus is ideal for our application. We present a compressive imaging model to our proposed image measurement system and simulate image reconstruction performance. The compressive imaging sensing and reconstruction models are then modified to incorporate an exploitation task into the sensing and reconstruction process, the results being twofold: A more structured encoding for the measurement process, and an algorithm capable of reconstructing the processed imagery with the same computations as reconstructing the image itself. The equations are generated for an arbitrary linear filtering exploitation algorithm and we present some results based upon a quadratic correlation filtering target detection algorithm.
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David Bottisti and Robert Muise "Image exploitation from encoded measurements", Proc. SPIE 8165, Unconventional Imaging, Wavefront Sensing, and Adaptive Coded Aperture Imaging and Non-Imaging Sensor Systems, 816518 (13 September 2011); https://doi.org/10.1117/12.894445
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