2 February 2012 Non-invasive gas monitoring in newborn infants using diode laser absorption spectroscopy: a case study
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Abstract
Non-invasive diode laser spectroscopy was, for the first time, used to assess gas content in the intestines and the lungs of a new-born, 4 kg, baby. Two gases, water vapor and oxygen, were studied with two low-power tunable diode lasers, illuminating the surface skin tissue and detecting the diffusely emerging light a few centimeters away. The light, having penetrated into the tissue, had experienced absorption by gas located in the lungs and in the intestines. Very distinct water vapor signals were obtained from the intestines while imprint from oxygen was lacking, as expected. Detectable, but minor, signals of water vapor were also obtained from the lungs, illuminating the armpit area and detecting below the collar bone. Water vapor signals were seen but again oxygen signals were lacking, now due to the difficulties of penetration of the oxygen probing light into the lungs of this full-term baby. Ultra-sound images were obtained both from the lungs and from the stomach of the baby. Based on dimensions and our experimental findings, we conclude, that for early pre-term babies, also oxygen should be detectable in the lungs, in addition to intestine and lung detection of water vapor. The present paper focuses on the studies of the intestines while the lung studies will be covered in a forthcoming paper.
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Patrik Lundin, Emilie Krite Svanberg, Lorenzo Cocola, Märta Lewander, Stefan Andersson-Engels, John Jahr, Vineta Fellman, Katarina Svanberg, Sune Svanberg, "Non-invasive gas monitoring in newborn infants using diode laser absorption spectroscopy: a case study", Proc. SPIE 8229, Optical Diagnostics and Sensing XII: Toward Point-of-Care Diagnostics; and Design and Performance Validation of Phantoms Used in Conjunction with Optical Measurement of Tissue IV, 822903 (2 February 2012); doi: 10.1117/12.907464; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.907464
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