22 February 2012 Method and simulation to study 3D crosstalk perception
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Proceedings Volume 8288, Stereoscopic Displays and Applications XXIII; 82880X (2012); doi: 10.1117/12.906774
Event: IS&T/SPIE Electronic Imaging, 2012, Burlingame, California, United States
Abstract
To various degrees, all modern 3DTV displays suffer from crosstalk, which can lead to a decrease of both visual quality and visual comfort, and also affect perception of depth. In the absence of a perfect 3D display technology, crosstalk has to be taken into account when studying perception of 3D stereoscopic content. In order to improve 3D presentation systems and understand how to efficiently eliminate crosstalk, it is necessary to understand its impact on human perception. In this paper, we present a practical method to study the perception of crosstalk. The approach consists of four steps: (1) physical measurements of a 3DTV, (2) building of a crosstalk surface based on those measurements and representing specifically the behavior of that 3TV, (3) manipulation of the crosstalk function and application on reference images to produce test images degraded by crosstalk in various ways, and (4) psychophysical tests. Our approach allows both a realistic representation of the behavior of a 3DTV and the easy manipulation of its resulting crosstalk in order to conduct psycho-visual experiments. Our approach can be used in all studies requiring the understanding of how crosstalk affects perception of stereoscopic content and how it can be corrected efficiently.
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Dar'ya Khaustova, Laurent Blondé, Quan Huynh-Thu, Cyril Vienne, Didier Doyen, "Method and simulation to study 3D crosstalk perception", Proc. SPIE 8288, Stereoscopic Displays and Applications XXIII, 82880X (22 February 2012); doi: 10.1117/12.906774; https://doi.org/10.1117/12.906774
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