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11 June 2012 The spatial and temporal structure of thermal fluctuations associated with a vertical turbulent jet impinging a water surface: laboratory experiments and field observations
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Abstract
Infrared imaging, in both laboratory and field settings, has become a vital tool in diagnosing near-surface thermalhydrodynamic phenomena such as convective cells, accumulation of surfactant, and coherent turbulent structures. In this presentation, we initially focus on a laboratory scale (0.01-1m) subsurface vertical turbulent water jet that serves as a canonical flow. The jet has a slightly elevated temperature thus the warmer fluid serves as a passive marker. Infrared image sequences of the surface thermal field were collected for various water jet flow rates and for both "clean" and surfactant-contaminated surface conditions. Turbulent characteristics of the near-surface flow field were measured by means of Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV), and these are used to examine the statistical nature of the coupled thermal-hydrodynamic field. An analog of the laboratory jet is the discharge of power-plant cooling water through a vertical pipe on the ocean floor. High-resolution airborne infrared imagery has recently been acquired of such a discharge (from the Huntington Beach Generating Station, CA), and these data are compared with the laboratory results in an attempt to understand striking spatial patterns discovered on the ocean surface.
© (2012) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
K. Peter Judd, Ivan B. Savelyev, Geoffrey B. Smith, and George Marmorino "The spatial and temporal structure of thermal fluctuations associated with a vertical turbulent jet impinging a water surface: laboratory experiments and field observations", Proc. SPIE 8372, Ocean Sensing and Monitoring IV, 837208 (11 June 2012); https://doi.org/10.1117/12.919242
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